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Writing Poetry: Tips and Tricks

Everyone can write a poem – but it takes craft and practice to make a good one. If you’ve never written a poem, or want to revisit the form after dabbling in it in school, there are a few tips worth trying to help you begin (again) on a solid foundation. Here they are…

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Expand your references and read a lot of poetry. This will help you understand the craft better and figure out the styles and structures you like (or dislike). Check out the Poetry Foundation’s website for some of the world’s best poems.

 

Write

The only way you can improve is by practicing and developing your portfolio. If possible, make a habit out of writing every day. Experiment by following new forms or sticking to reliable favourites. You can also take notes throughout the day of inspirations and observations on a journal.

 

Be Intentional

Before you start a poem, think about what you want to say. What message, theme or idea do you want to get across? Why do you want to write about it? With clear intentions, your poem will have a direction for the readers/audiences to navigate.

 

Count on All Senses

Rather than simply telling a message as is, use imagery and action. Besides sight, leverage other senses (smell, touch, taste, hearing) to create a more vivid reading experience.

 

Get into the Rhythm

In poetry, the rhythm and pacing are as important as the words. It doesn’t necessarily have to rhyme, but every good poetry has an identifiable flow and/or musicality. To enhance the poem’s rhythm, try using active sentences (“I hold the pillow” rather than “the pillow is held by me”) or breaking the passage in different ways.

 

Team Up

It’s time to take your poetry out to the world. Join a poetry community, watch readings, participate in workshops, and get some feedback on your work from your peers. Afterwards, you can go back to writing with redrafts and revisions.

Writing Children’s Book: Tips and Tricks

Writing children’s book might be a creative pursuit that you’ve never considered before, but why not try? Children are avid readers, and the market is thriving – in the US and the UK, the growth of children’s book industry outstripped that of the overall print book market, with ever-increasing sales in 2017. Personalised children’s book is also on the rise, with more and more companies offering the customisable service/item.

Interested in joining the industry? Here are a few tips from established writers on creating a children’s storybook.

 

Research the Category

What kind of book do you want to publish? Children’s book could be divided into six categories:

Source: Kindlepreneur

After you’ve decided on the category, it is a great idea to look into two demographics: the child readers, and their guardians who will purchase and read the book with the children. “Your book will have to please parents and teachers just as much as children,” says author Eevi Jones. She recommends spending time with parents and teachers to get to know the buying audiences better. Don’t forget to read up on other books in the same category as yours to find out the popular themes, vocabulary and layouts.

 

Make Attractive Character(s)

This applies to all writing in general, but it’s especially important in children’s books to have appealing, multi-dimensional characters. “If you’re bored with a character, your reader will be, too,” say Lisa Rojany Buccieri and Peter Economy, co-authors of Writing Children’s Books For Dummies. Make sure your characters are relatable to kids and serve a purpose to the story’s development and/or message.

 

Keep It Simple

Keep sentences short and easy to follow,” says Alan Durant, author of Daddy, I Can’t Sleep. In writing your story, Durant recommends a focus on rhythm or repetition to “make the language sing… Remember you are writing for an older reader (a parent or sibling perhaps) and a child listener.”

 

How will you write your children’s book?