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How To Design Your First Business Card

With so many businesses and brands popping up, it’s hard to make your business card stand out without feeling like Patrick Bateman from American Psycho. Before you dig into the nitty gritty of it all, it’s important to consider the following tips before designing or printing:

1. What do you want your business card to say about you?

Your business card is essentially your idea on a wallet-sized piece of cardboard. Consider the purpose of your business and what you’d like your first impression to be. Almost like dating for the first time. For example, if you just want your contact details – do the research and find the best ways to layout that information. If you want the card to be whimsical and creative, explore those options but remember to keep it simple as you don’t have a lot of real estate.

2. The importance of COLOUR
What are the team colours for your brand? Colours can symbolise the tone of your business and can be used to highlight parts of your design. Be sure to experiment with different colour combinations of your brand before you settle for a business card design.

3. Avoid cheesy imagery
Cheesy imagery such as stock images and clip art can cheapen your brand. Create identifiable for your brand and shows that you are unique. The best option is to use your logo as the main focal point of your business card. If you do include a logo, be sure to use high-quality vectors to avoid pixelation or distortion.

4. Remember what business cards are for
This sounds like a no brainer, but you would be surprised by how crazy people go with their own business cards. Know that your business card is just a handout for contact details for when you’re networking between small groups of people and are not for closing sales. For hard sell marketing or spreading awareness between a large number of people, that kind of information can be reserved for a poster or in this day and age, paid online marketing campaigns.

Remember when Magazines were popular?

Since the 1800s to the early 2000s – magazines were not just printed books you found lying around in a doctor’s office. They were the backbone of pop culture and one of the most powerful tools of media consumption. Once everything became digital and the transition towards the Internet began, magazines and all things print were left forgotten.

 

Will we ever see the rise of print again? Highly unlikely. We are glued to our phones. The closest thing we have to magazine culture is Instagram. The magazine empire held onto a long history of selling the ideal lifestyle. Magazines were the equivalent to the bible for middle-class readers, indoctrinating a patriarchal idea of what to think and how to think. The industry controlled what you wore by telling you what was in or out, who to listen to, and the only source of journalism at the time.

 

Although fake news exists within the dark webs of the internet, consumers are much smarter now with resources and tools to fact-check at their disposal. Whatever comes next for the post-journalism and post-internet era, readers will evolve.

 

What do you think will be next?

Article source: Alexandra Kitty