Tagpainting

Graffiti: Vandalism or An Art Form?

What is “art” really? And how can we define the term? To put it simply, “art” is a form of expression. Anyone with a background in art can tell you that, regardless of the medium or the canvas. But where do we draw the line with street art? Graffiti has been a controversial topic of discussion in the art world, with many conservative audiences arguing that it is a form of vandalism. Let’s deconstruct the legal implications of graffiti.

Let’s say someone has painted over your car or your house without your permission. You wouldn’t be very happy about that. But would you feel the same if the painting was a beautiful work of art rather than a street tag? Do we discriminate the artwork based on its style or skill level? Or do we disregard the painting altogether because it’s someone’s property?

According to Angie Kordic from Wide Walls, “the excitement of being a renegade and the fear of getting caught is what many artists consider the very core of graffiti culture, especially during the days of rough, growing competition and the willing to become as good at drawing as you possibly could. When caught in act, however, the writers get charged with vandalism, fined, and given community service hours during which they help clean up graffiti. By definition, it is “an action involving deliberate destruction of or damage to public or private property”, and while we can’t argue that graffiti (mostly tags, considered a reductive form of art within graffiti community itself) often end up on someone’s walls, we do have to wonder if it really is “destruction” and if, perhaps, we’ve been asking the wrong question the whole time.”

What do you think? Is graffiti a form of vandalism?

Sources from: http://www.widewalls.ch/is-graffiti-art-or-vandalism/

Visual Arts: Rising Star Loribelle Spirovski

Local South-Western artist, Loribelle Spirvoski is the rising star of the art world. The 26-year-old Filipino-Serbian born resident has been a finalist in many prestigious art awards  such as the Portia Geach Memorial Prize and has been the one to watch since her entry in the Archibald Prize this year.

Source: Fairfield Champion

Source: Fairfield Champion

She specialises in acrylic and oil painting and is known for her explorations and experimentations between Realism and Pop. Spirovski often conceptualises with portraits and fusing them with anatomical parts and deconstructing her subjects to skeletal features. An example of this is seen from her previous works “Memento Mori” – a series reflecting the concept of anxiety; her own and others.

Source: Loribelle Spirovski

Source: Loribelle Spirovski

What makes Spirovski a stand-out is the quality of her work. She uses a hybrid of traditional mediums combined with unconventional and surreal ideas, and a sophisticated understanding of colour, toning and lighting.  often enjoys painting at home or in her room as she isolates herself from the conventional art world and prefers to paint in her “sanctuary”.

Source: Loribelle Spirovski

Source: Loribelle Spirovski

The current muse and subject of Spirovski’s works are paintings of her partner, world renowned Australian pianist, Simon Tedeschi pictured above.

To see more of Loribelle Spirovski’s work, you can check her out website: http://www.loribellespirovski.com/