CategoryWords

The Written Word, Writers, Fiction and Non-Fiction.

Ways to Self-Publishing

Gatekeeping has become less and less prominent these days, with everyone being able to create and share content with a touch of fingertip. It’s the same with publishing. For aspiring writers, self-publishing has become more and more popular in the recent years – what’s more enticing than the idea that you can make your own story book and have it in stores for others to read?

If you’re decided, there are a few paths towards self-publishing that you can consider.

DIY

The first is to organise everything yourself – copyediting, typesetting, formatting, designing, printing and marketing. This method gives you the most freedom, creative- and budget-wise. You can also reap the largest proceedings from the sales, since you don’t have to share the profits with anybody else (apart from any distribution-related costs, such as online retailer fee for e-books and print on demand for paperbacks).

 

Assemble a Team

You can hire external help for assistance in regards to various aspects of your book. This might include editors, proofreaders, illustrators, designers and publicists. This will lift off some tasks from you, but it can also be a lot pricier.

 

Hire a Publisher

There are a lot of hybrid publishing companies that you can hire to take on the “publisher” role for you – that is, they will take care of the design, formatting, editing/proofreading, copyright filing, marketing and more. You will have full ownership of your work, although in some cases the profits might be shared.

 

Which path are you most interested in?

Writing Children’s Book: Tips and Tricks

Writing children’s book might be a creative pursuit that you’ve never considered before, but why not try? Children are avid readers, and the market is thriving – in the US and the UK, the growth of children’s book industry outstripped that of the overall print book market, with ever-increasing sales in 2017. Personalised children’s book is also on the rise, with more and more companies offering the customisable service/item.

Interested in joining the industry? Here are a few tips from established writers on creating a children’s storybook.

 

Research the Category

What kind of book do you want to publish? Children’s book could be divided into six categories:

Source: Kindlepreneur

After you’ve decided on the category, it is a great idea to look into two demographics: the child readers, and their guardians who will purchase and read the book with the children. “Your book will have to please parents and teachers just as much as children,” says author Eevi Jones. She recommends spending time with parents and teachers to get to know the buying audiences better. Don’t forget to read up on other books in the same category as yours to find out the popular themes, vocabulary and layouts.

 

Make Attractive Character(s)

This applies to all writing in general, but it’s especially important in children’s books to have appealing, multi-dimensional characters. “If you’re bored with a character, your reader will be, too,” say Lisa Rojany Buccieri and Peter Economy, co-authors of Writing Children’s Books For Dummies. Make sure your characters are relatable to kids and serve a purpose to the story’s development and/or message.

 

Keep It Simple

Keep sentences short and easy to follow,” says Alan Durant, author of Daddy, I Can’t Sleep. In writing your story, Durant recommends a focus on rhythm or repetition to “make the language sing… Remember you are writing for an older reader (a parent or sibling perhaps) and a child listener.”

 

How will you write your children’s book?

Event/Exhibition: Brian Reed: We Need to Talk About S-Town

Can’t get enough of podcast? This event is for you.

Sydney Opera House presents Brian Reed: We Need to Talk About S-Town, a talk with the senior producer of This American Life and the host and co-creator of investigative journalism series S-Town. Reed will participate in an in-depth conversation about the groundbreaking podcast and its consequences. Attendees will also have a chance to ask questions in the Q&A session.

Tickets start from $50.90. For more information, visit Sydney Opera House’s website.

Saturday, July 29, 7.30pm | Sydney Opera House, Bennelong Point, Sydney

Event/Exhibition: Bankstown Poetry Slam featuring Rupi Kaur

As a part of the Sydney Writers’ Festival, Bankstown Poetry Slam’s May edition is bringing the internationally acclaimed poet Rupi Kaur to the show.

The event, which also features Bankstown local Iman Etri, is also opening a callout for performances and youth open mics. Registration for attendance and performance closes on May 5.

For more information, head to the event’s Facebook page or email info@bankstownpoetryslam.com.

Wednesday, May 24, 6.45-9pm | Bankstown Arts Centre, 5 Olympic Parade, Bankstown