CategoryVisual Arts

Visual Arts, Sculpture, Painting, Installations and more…

Design: 8 Sites to Help You Find Creative Inspiration Online

Working in design industry requires you to be creative at all times, but sometimes artist’s block is unavoidable. Luckily, we live in a digital age where inspiration is just a click away. Here are a few websites that would get you unstuck and help you gain new ideas.

  1. Awwwards

This site rates websites on their design, usability, creativity and content. You can also search for web design inspiration based on colour palette, tags, web categories, and more.

  1. Pinterest

In Pinterest, you can create moodboards to put interesting images in different categories. Just type in the search box for all kinds of artsy content!

  1. Behance

A portfolio platform for creative professionals, you can both discover new design works and showcase your own.

  1. The Noun Project

This website offers an abundance of icons, helping you understand the way designers communicate their messages through simple illustrations.

  1. Instagram

Go to the explore section and find an abundance of pictures related to your interests (and following lists) to help you ignite some new ideas. Here’s Studio 22’s picks for the best Instagram designers and photographers.

  1. Muzli

The site curates links to high quality design contents all over the Internet. You can also add Muzli as an extension to your browser, so that you can continue browsing without fear of missing out the most interesting creative work at the moment.

  1. Designspiration

The site offers the best design inspirations that are safe for work – no nudity, so you can browse it anywhere. You can also save and organize your favourite works and search by tags and colours.

  1. DeviantArt

The site is one of the longest-running social network for artists, with over 160,000 original art works – ranging from painting and sculpture to digital and pixel art – being uploaded every day.

Design: What Does ‘Design’ Really Mean?

by Mitchell Adams and Elizabeth Webster

In the race to stem the flow of complex product imports from low wage but increasingly skilled newly industrialised countries, Australia and other developed countries are nervously talking about the importance of research, development and design. This, they think, is where the high wage jobs will come from – and we in the ‘west’ have a unique handle on this. Thailand and China can assemble complex manufactured items, but ‘we’ have the monopoly on the inventive and creative parts.

Everyone is now hopping on the design bandwagon – design systems; design thinking; business model design; registered designs and design ideation. Even the economists are talking about design (in the context of a market).

But what is design really? In many respects, this is like asking fish where the water is. Every tangible product and intangible organisation has a design and always has had. But presumably, all those schools of design and designing businesses must believe they are adding value over and above what has been.

Design as applied art

Design is traditionally associated with applied art, or more precisely, aesthetically pleasing products. Applied art in this context includes recognisable areas such as fashion design, graphic design or product design.


Design as functionality

Traditionally the engineers also have used the term design. But this is to do with the functionality of the product, not its appearance. Hence, we have industrial design, engineering design and process design.

Increasingly, the term design now embraces appearance that is valued both for its own sake and because it enables desirable new forms of functionality. Apple is a champion of this. They require beauty in appearance but also demand that this appearance accommodates complex functionality. And they understand the power of a brand that can optimise these combined attributes. Consumers may not necessarily think about where the iPhone or MacBook is assembled, but they are being asked to turn their minds to where the product was designed. Hence Apple’s movement away from labelling their products as “Made in China” to “Designed in California”.


Design as process

Design has morphed again and now the term is used to describe a process that brings together seemingly unrelated groups of people to solve complex problems. The value here is employing design thinking to solve problems that ultimately enrich a user’s experience with a product or service. It is about creating an environment where stakeholders, not just the designers, can work collaboratively in the same space to solve the problem. Compared with the traditional ‘production line’ methods, these new design processes iterate between the upstream and downstream creators and end-users to produce an integrated and well thought through good and service.

The Centre for Design Innovation at Swinburne is a creature of this process. It takes a problem and creates outcomes that are end-user centric. Each problem requires a tailored working team with the right set of multidisciplinary skills. The aim is to enrich the end users’ life.

An example of a problem currently being tackled by the Centre is the reduction of head impacts during sports-related contact. The aim of the Centre’s Smart Cap and Gear project is to design an advanced wearable product that monitors in real time forces to the head and torso during sporting activities.

Likewise, at Swinburne’s Design Factory the group attest to the philosophy that design acts as a broker, bringing people together to solve complex problems. Along with their industry partner Visy, the Design Factory’s students and design coaches have recently redesigned the milk create. Helping to reduce the costs associated with storage, cleaning and theft, the solutions generated by the Design Factory are now with Visy’s supply chain stakeholders.

For many people design as process is nothing new. They have been doing this for…ever. This ‘movement’ is not aimed at them. The value in labelling an activity comes from highlighting what is implicit and enables those who do not work this way intuitively to change their behaviour. In this sense, bandwagon slogans and business review fashions do contribute to the economy. It’s just a pity they are using a confusing word.

The Conversation

Beth Webster, Director, Centre for Transformative Innovation, Swinburne University of Technology

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Digital: Six Designers To Follow on Instagram

As I mentioned in the previous post, Instagram is not just a place to procrastinate or look at your friends’ breakfast – it is also a place to share one’s works and inspire each other.

With designers, this view seems more befitting than ever. Instagram could be portfolio to some and inspiration moodboard for others. Here are a few Instagram accounts that you should follow for some of the most creative, unique and forward-thinking works on the net.

  1. Lucia Litman

A photo posted by lucy litman (@lucialitman) on

As a photographer and food stylist, Litman’s work shows wit and charm through colourful palette and a spoonful of humour.

  1. Lauren Hom

A photo posted by Lauren Hom (@homsweethom) on

Hom is a designer, illustrator and hand letterer who is currently travelling around the world. She has worked on projects for clients like Starbucks, Youtube, Google and TIME Magazine.

  1. Daniel Aristizabal

A photo posted by Daniel Aristizabal (@darias88) on

Aristizabal is a motion graphics designer and animator. For imaginative 3D illustrations, look no further.

  1. Andrew Kovacs

Kovacs’s penchant for architecture is demonstrated in his account, through photographs of unique structures, floor plan sketches, and more.

  1. The Company You Keep

TCYK is a design-led company based in Melbourne. Specialising in brand identity and strategy, TCYK’s works will get everyone sold.

  1. Dwell Magazine

A photo posted by Dwell (@dwellmagazine) on

Dwell’s Instagram account offers compelling architecture and interior design photographs, from cottages in Baja California, Mexico to farm homes in Dolomite mountains in northeastern Italy.

Digital: Five Instagram Photographers To Follow

Instagram is not only a place to procrastinate – it could also be a place to find new inspirations and discover emerging visual artists.

A lot of photographers have featured their works and portfolio on Instagram for you to keep an eye on. Here are a few that you might like…


Michael Christopher Brown (@michaelchristopherbrown)

A photo posted by @michaelchristopherbrown on

Brown is a New York-based photographer and filmmaker. His latest pictures were taken in Cuba and Congo.


Theron Humphrey (@thiswildidea)

A photo posted by Theron Humphrey (@thiswildidea) on

If you like rustic American scene and dogs, @thiswildidea would be the right account to follow. Humphrey’s pictures often feature his dog, Maddie the Coonhound.


Tiffany Nguyen (@tiffpenguin)

A photo posted by tiffany nguyen (@tiffpenguin) on

When she is not working as a dentist, the Los Angeles-based photographer would be trawling outdoors and taking pictures of natural landscapes.


Vicky Navarro (@lavicvic)

A photo posted by VickyNavarro (@lavicvic) on

For sharp urban photography with dark palette, check out this account.


Scott Schuman (@thesartorialist)

Schuman’s works show that fashion is not just about people on the runway.

A Brief Overview of Construction Art

What’s the deal with Construction Art? Is it really art? Is it important or had relevance towards the art movements we know today? Being a major influence in the Bauhaus and De Stijl movement,  Constructivism emerged as an artistic and architectural concept. In 1913, Constructivism was created by Vladimir Tatlin in Russia.

As a rejection of independent and sovereign art, Tatlin aimed  ‘to construct’ art for social purposes. During the 20th century, it influenced architecture design, graphic design, industrial design, theatre, film, dance, fashion as well as music. The definition of Constructivism was a combination of faktura meaning the particular material properties of an object, and tektonika, meaning its spatial presence.

It was known that the first  Constructivists were artists like Liubov Popova, Alexander Vesnin, Rodchenko, Varvara Stepanova, and theorists Aleksei Gan, Boris Arvatov and Osip Brik. They were early developers of a technique that we know now as the photomontage. Sharing similarities with Dadaism, the collage method was less destructive during the Constructivism movement.

In this day and age, many contemporary artists have taken upon literally deconstructions of the idea of construction art. With independent artists and online retailers selling very similar constructivism artworks such as photographs of excavators and machinery. You can find these works at Fine Art America.

Images sourced from Fine Art America.

Event/Exhibition: Archibald, Wynne and Sulman Prizes 2016

The Archibald, Wynne and Sulman Prizes annual exhibition is back in the Art Gallery of NSW, July 16-October 9.

The exhibition features the artworks of the prize winners and finalists, as well as those of budding artists aged 5-18 on display in the Young Archies.

The Archibald Prize, one of Australia’s most prestigious art award, is given to the best portrait painting. The 2016 winner is Louise Hearman’s ‘Barry’, a portrait painting of entertainer Barry Humphries.

The Wynne Prize is awarded to the best landscape painting of Australian scenery, or figure sculpture, while the Sulman Prize is given to the best subject painting, genre painting or mural project in oil, acrylic, watercolour or mixed media. Wynne’s 2016 winner is Ken Family Collaborative’s ‘Seven sister’, and Sulman’s 2016 winner is Esther Stewart’s ‘Flatland dreaming’.

The trustees of the Art Gallery of NSW judge the Archibald and Wynne, while senior painter Judy Watson was invited to judge the Sulman this year.

Tickets to the exhibition can be bought here.

Event/Exhibition: Australian Life Photography Exhibition 2016 at Hyde Park

City Of Sydney has launched an outdoor gallery/exhibition at Hyde Park, showcasing the works of finalists in Australian Life photo competition.

Focusing on the idea of Australian identity, the photographs were chosen by a panel of photographers, artists, and curators, from works submitted by emerging and professional photographers across the country.

The finalists, whose works are featured in the Park, are Marian Abboud, John Appleyard, Kris Baum, Rae Begley, Deb Bonney, Aaron Bradbrook, Simone Cheung, Cameron Cope, Anna Maria Antoinette D’Addario, Ian English, Amy Jean Harding, Taweechai Iam-urairat, Kent Johnson, Jon Lewis, Georgie Mattingley, Nikki McLennan, Darren Saul, Steven Sherwin, Frank Trimarchi, Ess Vaun, Rebecca Webb, and Kerry Wilson.

The outdoor gallery runs September 15-October 9, 7am-9pm at Hyde Park North, near Archibald Fountain.

Exhibition: Discover Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera’s Collection in AGNSW

Extended by popular demand, the Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera exhibition is sticking around for a little bit longer at the Art Gallery of New South Wales.

As mentioned on their website: “this is a rare chance to see masterpieces by the two leading figures of Mexican 20th-century art.

The exhibition presents 33 artworks from the renowned collection of Jacques and Natasha Gelman, including outstanding self-portrait paintings and drawings by Frida Kahlo, and major examples of Diego Rivera’s canvas paintings.”

Source: Lillenord

Source: Lillenord

“Alongside these works are over 50 photographs by figures such as Edward Weston, Lola Alvarez Bravo and Frida’s father, Guillermo Kahlo, which provide insights into the artists’ worlds and their intriguing relationship.”

Source: AGNSW

Source: AGNSW

To discover the stories and explore the lives of Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera through their works of art, book your tickets now:

Visual Arts: Rising Star Loribelle Spirovski

Local South-Western artist, Loribelle Spirvoski is the rising star of the art world. The 26-year-old Filipino-Serbian born resident has been a finalist in many prestigious art awards  such as the Portia Geach Memorial Prize and has been the one to watch since her entry in the Archibald Prize this year.

Source: Fairfield Champion

Source: Fairfield Champion

She specialises in acrylic and oil painting and is known for her explorations and experimentations between Realism and Pop. Spirovski often conceptualises with portraits and fusing them with anatomical parts and deconstructing her subjects to skeletal features. An example of this is seen from her previous works “Memento Mori” – a series reflecting the concept of anxiety; her own and others.

Source: Loribelle Spirovski

Source: Loribelle Spirovski

What makes Spirovski a stand-out is the quality of her work. She uses a hybrid of traditional mediums combined with unconventional and surreal ideas, and a sophisticated understanding of colour, toning and lighting.  often enjoys painting at home or in her room as she isolates herself from the conventional art world and prefers to paint in her “sanctuary”.

Source: Loribelle Spirovski

Source: Loribelle Spirovski

The current muse and subject of Spirovski’s works are paintings of her partner, world renowned Australian pianist, Simon Tedeschi pictured above.

To see more of Loribelle Spirovski’s work, you can check her out website:

Visual Arts: Archibald Prize Tour 2016

The most anticipated and the most prestigious competition for Australian visual artists and audiences alike is the annual Archibald Prize.

First awarded in 1921, it is one of Australia’s oldest art awards event. Judged by the trustees of the Art Gallery of NSW and awarded to the best portrait painting, the Archibald Prize exhibition is a who’s who of Australian culture – from politicians to celebrities, sporting heroes to artists.

The touring exhibition is an opportunity to see all the finalists in the Archibald Prize 2016.


Entries in the Archibald Prize are also eligible for the following prizes.

Packing Room Prize
First awarded in 1991 and chosen by the Gallery staff who receive, unpack and hang the entries, with 51 per cent of the vote going to the Gallery’s storeman, Steve Peters

People’s Choice
First awarded in 1988 and voted for by the public visiting the Archibald exhibition


If you’re interested in entering next year – submit your works below:

For more information, visit the AGNSW website and follow the prompts: