CategoryVisual Arts

Visual Arts, Sculpture, Painting, Installations and more…

5 Things You Didn’t Know About Karl Lagerfeld

Last week, the world has lost the iconic and celebrated German Fashion Designer and renowned artistic director at Chanel and Fendi, Karl Lagerfeld. He was 85 when he passed in Paris due to an ongoing battle with pancreatic cancer. Although he is well-known for his luxury, his mark in the fashion industry and for his controversies, there are few facts that not everyone knew.

 

  1. His beloved cat, Choupette stands to inherit millions.
    Lagerfeld’s cat Choupette could be in line to inherit a portion of his $300 million-dollar fortune.

 

  1. Karl had his signature ponytail since 1976.

Before his white ponytail, white-shirt black tuxedo signature look, he didn’t have one. During his years in the industry, he wore his hair long and curly before he changed his grooming style that lasted over 36 years.

  1. He has directed a movie with Pharrell Williams.

Lagerfeld showcased his creative mind in a film called Reincarnation starring Cara Delevigne. The story was based on the birth of the iconic Chanel jacket inspired by a hotel elevator operator while she was on holiday.

  1. Karl Lagerfeld was also a photographer.

Karl Lagerfeld had many ties into the art world – one of them being through his photography. He showcased many of his photography works and has even photographed celebrities like Kim Kardashian.

  1. Karl had a long-term relationship back in the early 1970s.

Karl Lagerfeld was a private man and only revealed details about his late ex-boyfriend, Jacques de Bascher many years later. They were together for 18 years until De Bascher passed away in 1989 of AIDS. During that time, De Bascher had also been in a romantic affair with Yves Saint Laurent which Lagerfeld knew all about and apparently orchestrated. Lagerfeld also didn’t believe in having sex with the person he loves, opening up his lifestyle of hiring high-class escorts for his sexual activities.

 

How To Design Your First Business Card

With so many businesses and brands popping up, it’s hard to make your business card stand out without feeling like Patrick Bateman from American Psycho. Before you dig into the nitty gritty of it all, it’s important to consider the following tips before designing or printing:

1. What do you want your business card to say about you?

Your business card is essentially your idea on a wallet-sized piece of cardboard. Consider the purpose of your business and what you’d like your first impression to be. Almost like dating for the first time. For example, if you just want your contact details – do the research and find the best ways to layout that information. If you want the card to be whimsical and creative, explore those options but remember to keep it simple as you don’t have a lot of real estate.

2. The importance of COLOUR
What are the team colours for your brand? Colours can symbolise the tone of your business and can be used to highlight parts of your design. Be sure to experiment with different colour combinations of your brand before you settle for a business card design.

3. Avoid cheesy imagery
Cheesy imagery such as stock images and clip art can cheapen your brand. Create identifiable for your brand and shows that you are unique. The best option is to use your logo as the main focal point of your business card. If you do include a logo, be sure to use high-quality vectors to avoid pixelation or distortion.

4. Remember what business cards are for
This sounds like a no brainer, but you would be surprised by how crazy people go with their own business cards. Know that your business card is just a handout for contact details for when you’re networking between small groups of people and are not for closing sales. For hard sell marketing or spreading awareness between a large number of people, that kind of information can be reserved for a poster or in this day and age, paid online marketing campaigns.

Remember when Magazines were popular?

Since the 1800s to the early 2000s – magazines were not just printed books you found lying around in a doctor’s office. They were the backbone of pop culture and one of the most powerful tools of media consumption. Once everything became digital and the transition towards the Internet began, magazines and all things print were left forgotten.

 

Will we ever see the rise of print again? Highly unlikely. We are glued to our phones. The closest thing we have to magazine culture is Instagram. The magazine empire held onto a long history of selling the ideal lifestyle. Magazines were the equivalent to the bible for middle-class readers, indoctrinating a patriarchal idea of what to think and how to think. The industry controlled what you wore by telling you what was in or out, who to listen to, and the only source of journalism at the time.

 

Although fake news exists within the dark webs of the internet, consumers are much smarter now with resources and tools to fact-check at their disposal. Whatever comes next for the post-journalism and post-internet era, readers will evolve.

 

What do you think will be next?

Article source: Alexandra Kitty

 

Photography: 2019 Nikon Surf Photo and Video of the Year Awards Open for Entries

Hitting the beach this summer? Might as well win a new camera kit at that.

Nikon is partnering with Surfing Australia to hold the Nikon Surf Photo and Video of the Year Award, honouring the best works from surf photographers and videographers.

The award is open to Australian residents, and the images can be taken anywhere in the world in 2018 across the categories of action, lifestyle/portrait and scenic photography.

The winners will be picked by a panel of judges, including seven-time champion of the Women’s World Surf League Tour and Nikon Ambassador Stephanie Gilmore, based on the following criteria: innovation and creativity; dramatic affect and sensory impact; uniqueness; and composition of the photo.

“Surfing is in the DNA of every Australian – even if you can’t actually surf yourself, there’s no way that you don’t get a thrill from seeing the incredible untamed power of the ocean,” said Gilmore. “As a photographer myself, I look forward to seeing how Aussie’s capture the surf for this year’s competition.”

The winner of the Surf Photo of the Year will get a Nikon Z 7 kit, and the winner of the Surf Video of the Year will get a Nikon Z 6 kit.

You can enter up to three photos and two videos until submission closes on February 15. For more info, visit the website.

Exhibition: Are We Alone?, Sydney

Do you want to believe? So do these three Sydney artists, as they explore the belief in intelligent alien life reportedly held by 61% of the world’s population through this art exhibition next week.

Aptly held at Mothership Art Studios in Marrickville, Are We Alone? is a collaboration by live artist and painter Lara Colby, textile artist Katarzyna Niedzielak, and award-winning signwriter AJ Nelson.

Colby has performed live art and showcased her paintings at major music festivals such as Void (2015), Regrowth (2015) and Psyfari (2016, 2018).

 

 

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Niedzielak, also known as Art by Amoeba, has exhibited her three-dimensional objects, wearable art and textiles at Modern Artifacts, Psyfari and Space Gallery.

Nelson, who specialises in 3D pattern creation on wood, will be producing works to evoke crop circles using CAD software and CNC router.

The exhibition will open from November 10-15. For more information, visit the Facebook page.

Saturday, November 10, 6pm | Mothership Studios, 18-22 Sydney Street, Marrickville

Event: Japanese Film Festival Classics at AGNSW, Sydney

This month, the Japanese Film Festival Classics is returning to the Art Gallery of New South Wales.

With the theme of Passion and Obsession, the festival is screening 16mm and 35mm films from the Japanese Golden Age and New Wave eras. These films not only represent the vision of cinematic legends such as Kenji Mizoguchi and Yoshishige Yoshida, but also offer glimpses into different faces of Japan throughout the decades – from star-crossed lovers divided by class in the Meiji era to early modern feminists fighting against the societal status quo.

The screenings run Wednesdays and select Saturdays and Sundays for free. For the full program and more information, visit the AGNSW’s website.

October 3-31 | Domain Theatre, Art Gallery of NSW, Art Gallery Road, Sydney

Photography: Melbourne’s VAC Gallery Calls for Submissions for October Exhibition

A chance to showcase your photography work has arrived – the VAC Gallery in Melbourne is calling for submissions for its upcoming exhibition.

Set to launch in October, the exhibition Moving Melbourne: Cities don’t stand still will be highlighting “a Melbourne that’s always in motion”. Photographers are invited to submit up to three images of street photography (not posed or studio) that pay homage to the theme.

Submissions are open until Wednesday, September 19. For more information, visit the website.

Event: Sydney Contemporary

This September, the annual international art fair is returning to Carriageworks for its fourth year running.

Held from September 13 to 16, Sydney Contemporary is bringing the largest and more diverse gathering of local and international galleries, showcasing the works of more than 300 leading and emerging artists from over 30 countries. Alongside the galleries, there will be curated sectors for contemporary video, installation art and performance as well as engaging panel discussions, guided tours and educational workshops.

The participating restaurants for this year are yet to be announced, but considering the impressive lineups from last year (Billy Kwong by Kylie Kwong and Kitchen by Mike McEnearney) and the year before (Longrain and Subcontinental), we can set our expectations high.

Tickets start from $10. For more information, visit the website.

September 13-16 | Carriageworks, 245 Wilson Street, Eveleigh

Visual Arts: Photography is “More Dead than Ever”, Says Wim Wenders

Renowned filmmaker and photographer Wim Wenders has declared photography to be “more dead than ever”, thanks to the rise of smartphones.

In a BBC video, Wenders said while “billions” of pictures are taken every day, photography “is more dead than ever”.

“The trouble with iPhone pictures is nobody sees them,” said Wenders. “Even the people who take them don’t look at them anymore, and they certainly don’t make prints.”

While more cameras today come with features meant to assist people in creating photographs, Wenders suggested these might impede creativity. “I know from experience that the less you have, the more creative you have to become,” he said.

Wenders also said selfies do not count as photography. “I take selfies myself, of course,” said Wenders, “but it’s not photography. Looking into a mirror is not an act of photography.”

Wenders is not alone in having this sentiment. Mexican photojournalist Antonio Olmos also said that phone cameras represent a threat to photography. “Photographers are getting destroyed by the rise of iPhones,” said Olmos.

“The photographers who used to make £1000 for a weekend taking wedding pictures are the ones facing the squeeze. Increasingly, we don’t need photographers – we can do just as well ourselves.”

For this reason, Britain’s Nick Knight refused to be identified as a photographer. “I think photography stopped years ago and we shouldn’t try and hold back a new medium by defining it with old terms,” Knight said in an interview with The Business of Fashion’s Tim Blanks.

“I call it image-making — please could someone get a better description of it — because that’s what I do… So it’s based on image. That gets away from the thing of truth. Photography has been saddled as the medium of truth for so many years. That’s where its criticism has always been directed, ‘This photograph has been manipulated’ … I’m very pleased that image-making has freed itself from those constraints.”

Do you share any of this view? Is photography dead, and has “image-making” taken its place?

Event: Top Dog Film Festival, Sydney

Dogs and flicks – what’s not to love?

After its launch last year, the Top Dog Film Festival is coming back this year in Cremorne. The afternoon will be a two-hour cinematic celebration honouring the bond between dogs and their people, with a carefully curated program of canine-themed films from independent filmmakers around the globe.

Adult tickets are $25.5, excluding booking fee. For more information and other dates, visit the Top Dog Film Festival’s website.

Sunday, July 15, 3.15pm | Hayden Orpheum Picture Palace, 380 Military Road, Cremorne