CategoryVisual Arts

Visual Arts, Sculpture, Painting, Installations and more…

Event/Exhibition: Celebrate Studio Ghibli Showcase, Australia

Love yourself some Studio Ghibli flicks? Well, good news – the animation house’s complete catalogue is coming to Australian cinemas.

The showcase features all 22 films from Ghibli, including the popular My Neighbor Totoro, Spirited Away and Princess Mononoke, the seldom seen Ghiblies Episode 2, and the first ever to be screened in Australia, Ocean Waves.

The opening night of Celebrate Studio Ghibli Showcase also promises an event to remember, as ticket holders can get an opportunity to win special A1 print by award-winning artist Shaun Tan.

The showcase will run from August 24 to September 20 at select cinemas across the country. For tickets and more information, visit Studio Ghibli’s website.

Graffiti: Vandalism or An Art Form?

What is “art” really? And how can we define the term? To put it simply, “art” is a form of expression. Anyone with a background in art can tell you that, regardless of the medium or the canvas. But where do we draw the line with street art? Graffiti has been a controversial topic of discussion in the art world, with many conservative audiences arguing that it is a form of vandalism. Let’s deconstruct the legal implications of graffiti.

Let’s say someone has painted over your car or your house without your permission. You wouldn’t be very happy about that. But would you feel the same if the painting was a beautiful work of art rather than a street tag? Do we discriminate the artwork based on its style or skill level? Or do we disregard the painting altogether because it’s someone’s property?

According to Angie Kordic from Wide Walls, “the excitement of being a renegade and the fear of getting caught is what many artists consider the very core of graffiti culture, especially during the days of rough, growing competition and the willing to become as good at drawing as you possibly could. When caught in act, however, the writers get charged with vandalism, fined, and given community service hours during which they help clean up graffiti. By definition, it is “an action involving deliberate destruction of or damage to public or private property”, and while we can’t argue that graffiti (mostly tags, considered a reductive form of art within graffiti community itself) often end up on someone’s walls, we do have to wonder if it really is “destruction” and if, perhaps, we’ve been asking the wrong question the whole time.”

What do you think? Is graffiti a form of vandalism?

Sources from: http://www.widewalls.ch/is-graffiti-art-or-vandalism/

The Compulsion to Create: ‘Outsider Art’ at MONA’s The Museum of Everything

Ted Snell, University of Western Australia

Who is an artist and when does a fabricated object become art? The 200 individuals represented in The Museum of Everything exhibition at MONA in Hobart focus our attention on these questions. On the website they are described as “untrained, unintentional, undiscovered and unclassifiable artists of modern times”. They are hermits, governesses, housewives, former miners, taxidermists and ex-soldiers, working in painting, sculpture, and an extraordinary range of other media.

While these people may “unintentionally” be making something we might want to describe as art, they are the most focused, driven and compulsive group of makers we are ever likely to encounter, and there is nothing that is unintended in the things they fabricate. Indeed they make these images and objects because they must depict in some form what is most important to them in their lives.

After an exhilarating journey through 30 rooms and many corridors of remarkable images and objects, these questions about the nature of art and the credentials of artists reach a critical mass. Finally, you arrive in a backyard courtyard, entered through a fly-wire screen door. Painted on the wall is a call-out for more people who might be included in some future exhibition. It asks, are you a self-taught or secret artist? Is your home your own personal gallery? Have you invented a private language? If so contact The Museum of Everything.

This last advertisement alerts us to the real conundrum of encountering so many unique individuals and creative practices, who likely never expected us to engage with the things they have made. If they are secret artists, who have developed a private language and wish to keep their activities to themselves, what are we doing prying into their work and their lives?

Can we even call what they make “art”, in the way we conventionally define it, if there is no intention to communicate with an audience?

Untitled (all), Bogdan Zietek, 1970–2010, Courtesy of The Museum of Everything.
Moorilla Gallery, CC BY

Outsiders, or just artists?

Other writers have struggled to explain the remarkable work produced by men and women for whom the act of creation is fundamental to their existence. After the second world war, the French artist Jean Dubuffet coined the label art brut, or raw art, to describe the amazing work he collected from individuals incarcerated in institutions or those that made art privately to fulfil a deep need.

In the 1970s, Roger Cardinal, a British academic, opted for outsider art as a more useful catch-all for artists working on the margins of the art world. Others have grouped the work of this army of practitioners under classifications such as naïve art, visionary art and folk art.

Whatever box we put them in, and none is entirely satisfactory, the artists whose works adorn the walls of MONA are clearly extraordinary.

Courtesy of The Museum of Everything.
Moorilla Gallery, CC BY

These objects have been removed from the homes, hospitals, and workshops where they were made. We are forced to make decisions about how to approach and read them and how to react after engaging with them. We must learn to lift the filters we normally have in place in an art gallery and really look hard at works that break rules, disrupt expectations and offer us insights into the lives of remarkable human beings.

Creative lives

Each of these artists has remade their world through a physical engagement with the tools of art, and because of that, we have a window into some extraordinary personal narratives.

There is Henry Darger the hospital custodian from Chicago who returned home each evening to continue working on his manuscript, “The Story of the Vivian Girls, in What is Known as the Realms of the Unreal, of the Glandeco-Angelinian War Storm, Caused by the Child Slave Rebellion”. He is represented in the exhibition by a series of consecutive panels of drawings illustrating his magnum opus, a sprawling and tender series of traced images woven together with pencil and watercolour.

Untitled (all), Alikhan Abdollahi, c. 2010, Paper mache.
Moorilla Gallery, CC BY

Adolf Wölfli was disturbed and violent, living most of his life in the Waldau Clinic, a psychiatric hospital in Bern. He drew compulsively and like Darger set out to create a massive literary work, in his case a rambling autobiography that saw his gradual elevation to the Sainthood as “St Adolf II”. His dense, complicated and intense drawings in pencil fill the page, leaving no space inactive.

In 2007, I had the opportunity to meet Stan Hopewell, who is represented in this exhibition by his masterwork “The Last Supper”. The task appeared so great, so necessary and so profound that to embark on it Stan required divine guidance. When his wife Joyce became ill, Stan made a pact with his God that he would continue to write and paint to celebrate God’s Love while Joyce remained alive.

Over the next five years, he filled his house with paintings, which he believed were made with the assistance of an “an unseen Angel” and wrote pages upon pages of a stream-of-consciousness manifesto about his life and his beliefs. The day Joyce died, Stan stopped writing and painting. His fantastical works incorporate the events of his life, his family, his abiding faith and current events. They were agglomerations that evolved, each addition adding to the complexity and the scale of the work, incorporating angels with flapping wings, illuminated with lights and adorned with his wife’s knickknacks.

Ambition and obsession

Darger, Wölfli, and Hopewell are only three of the human stories from the vast array that lie behind the over 2,000 objects hung throughout the temporary gallery space of MONA. Of course, they add a dimension to our reading of the work, but it is also true that the imagery is so powerful, so disruptive, so fresh and confronting that it commands our attention.

Untitled (all), Calvin and Ruby Black, 1955–1972, Courtesy of The Museum of Everything.
CC BY

What makes this work so arresting is the urgency of its making. These are images and objects that had to be made, that could no longer be repressed. Whether intended for others or created for solitary contemplation, they have an intensity that draws us deep into their fabricated worlds.

Obsessive detail is a common stylistic trait. Scale and ambition are others. Hans-Jörg Georgi’s amazing flight of aircraft, designed for escape from an uninhabitable planet, spiral through the gallery space in a torrent of energy. Their fuselages, carefully constructed from cardboard and tape, are maniacally compulsive, showing each detail of the engines and propellers, the wing mechanisms, passenger decks and windows. Both prophetic and wildly funny, this work, like so many others in the exhibition, requires a shift in consciousness to fully absorb its significance.

Untitled (all), Hans-Jörg Georgi, 2010–15, Courtesy of The Museum of Everything.
Moorilla Gallery, CC BY

What better place to confront these works than in MONA, a space that has rethought the modern museum and helped us to re-imagine the experience of engaging with artworks? The works are set within rooms designed to create the sense of a slightly dilapidated home-museum: wallpapered, sporadically architraved, cluttered with objects and glass display cases.

It is James Brett, the founder of The Museum of Everything and curator of this show, whose guiding intelligence is everywhere present. Each room is themed. Carefully positioned works draw you through into the next room of wonders where new relationships and variations on old themes play out.

Like every passionate collection, the compulsion to overwhelm is never resisted, but strangely this leads to an insatiable appetite for more. This is most definitely an exhibition that both requires and demands multiple visits.

Which brings us back to those big questions: is it art, and should we be viewing it? Perhaps the best way to describe the individuals whose works fill the Museum of Everything is that they separately and as a group pose questions about the nature of art and challenge us to ponder what it means to be an artist. Significantly, through this process, they highlight the sense of our own humanity and showcase the qualities we ascribe to humanness. What could be more rewarding, inspiring and affirming?


The ConversationThe Museum of Everything will showing at MONA until April 2 2018.

Ted Snell, Professor, Chief Cultural Officer, Cultural Precinct, University of Western Australia

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Visual Arts: GOMA’s Building to Feature James Turrell’s Light Artwork for Its 10th Anniversary

Queensland’s Gallery of Modern Art (GOMA) is celebrating its 10th anniversary by transforming its building with a major light installation from international light artist James Turrell.

The installation, which will be revealed to public in early December, will be a permanent feature of GOMA building thereafter. The installation is planned to light up the gallery’s southern and eastern facades every evening.

The gallery’s lead architects, Kerry Clare, Lindsay Clare and James Jones said they envisioned “an artist illuminated ‘white box’ on the building’s main pedestrian approaches”.

GOMA director Chris Saines said the milestone event provided an occasion to realise the architects’ vision. “It needed something like a major anniversary to get everyone galvanised,” Saines said. “It’s like it’s been in hibernation as a project, and I just thought the tenth anniversary was a really good time to wake it up.”

Saines said Turrell will bring a new touch to his work for GOMA. “He’s undoubtedly the world’s most influential artist who works with the medium of light,” he said. “This is a very different kind of Turrell work and I think that will make our building a destination for Turrell lovers.”

Turrell is also slated to be present for the lighting on of the building in celebration of GOMA’s 10th anniversary.

The installation has been in the works since late 2013, funded by private benefactors as well as contributions from the Queensland Government. The gallery’s supporters are also invited to donate through the 2017 QAGOMA Foundation Appeal.

Event/Exhibition: It’s Pronounced “GIF,” Not “GIF”

Do you think meme is a form of art? If the answer is yes, this might be the exhibition you’ve been looking for.

It’s Pronounced “GIF,” Not “GIF” is an art exhibition curated by Con Gerakaris, which seeks to explore Internet art and its commodification in a capitalist world. Drawing upon digital artworks commonly found in Instagram feeds and Tumblr dashboards, the exhibition promises a subversion of Western art canon through the lens of “perverted capitalism”.

Featured artists include:

  • A-nrd (London, UK)
  • Michelle Cho (Los Angeles, USA)
  • Simon Falk (Toronto, CAN)
  • John Karel (Philadelphia, USA)
  • Danielle Karlikoff (Sydney, AUS)
  • Nicholas Keays (Melbourne, AUS)
  • James Jirat Patradoon (Sydney, AUS)
  • Saulonzo (Anioch, USA)

For more information, visit the exhibition’s Facebook page.

Wednesday, March 1, 6pm | Goodspace Gallery, 115 Regent Street, Chippendale

News: Netflix Releases New Documentary ‘Abstract: The Art of Design’

Netflix has finally entered the design world with its new series, ‘Abstract: The Art of Design’.

The documentary focuses on the lives, crafts and perspectives of the best creative workers in their respective fields, such as architecture, apparel, graphic design, and photography. With imaginative visual, the series dissects the thinking and working process of these creators in unconventional ways.

The featured creators, who each gets an episode, are illustrator Christoph Niemann, footwear designer Tinker Hatfield, stage designer Es Devlin, architect Bjarke Ingels, automotive designer Ralph Gilles, graphic designer Paula Scher, photographer Platon, and interior designer Ilse Crawford.

‘Abstract: The Art of Design’ was launched as a part of the Docuseries Showcase at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival and is available via streaming now.

Art Galleries and Creative Spaces To Check Out In Redfern

When getting your art fix, the best places to check out reside within the creative villages in Redfern. Take a couple of your creative friends and spend a lovely crafternoon exploring the melting pot of cultures within the outskirts of Sydney.
Here are few inspiring galleries and spaces for you to check out:

White Rabbit
Described as a “sizable art gallery featuring contemporary Chinese works” founded by Kerr and Judith Neilson in 2000. White Rabbit is an ideal place to relax where you can also enjoy a street-level tea house with snacks.

Carriageworks
Located inside the industrial pockets of Redfern, Carriageworks breathes as a contemporary and multi-arts centre. Lead by local artists, Carriageworks engages with other creatives and audiences with contemporary ideas and issues.

Blakspot
A private art space in the core of Redfern, Blakspot pays tribute to our indigenous ancestors holding a collection of Aboriginal artworks.  Inspired by the natural flora and fauna of Australia as well as the stories of our original landowners, Blakspot is a great window into Australia’s history.

The Bearded Tit
Don’t get too excited by the name, the Bearded Tit is just a vibrant bar and art space on Regents St. With quirky decor, including wall-mounted animal heads and gilt mirrors, the Bearded Tit welcomes all walks of life who enjoy art and the occasional hair on the dog.

Nussinov Gallery
For Micha Nussinov fans, Nussinov Gallery is a home for all of Micha’s creative and audio works of art. The gallery exhibits the diverse and evocative range of her creations. Uncover the layers of her digital collages and her illustrations.

Design: 8 Sites to Help You Find Creative Inspiration Online

Working in design industry requires you to be creative at all times, but sometimes artist’s block is unavoidable. Luckily, we live in a digital age where inspiration is just a click away. Here are a few websites that would get you unstuck and help you gain new ideas.

  1. Awwwards

This site rates websites on their design, usability, creativity and content. You can also search for web design inspiration based on colour palette, tags, web categories, and more.

  1. Pinterest

In Pinterest, you can create moodboards to put interesting images in different categories. Just type in the search box for all kinds of artsy content!

  1. Behance

A portfolio platform for creative professionals, you can both discover new design works and showcase your own.

  1. The Noun Project

This website offers an abundance of icons, helping you understand the way designers communicate their messages through simple illustrations.

  1. Instagram

Go to the explore section and find an abundance of pictures related to your interests (and following lists) to help you ignite some new ideas. Here’s Studio 22’s picks for the best Instagram designers and photographers.

  1. Muzli

The site curates links to high quality design contents all over the Internet. You can also add Muzli as an extension to your browser, so that you can continue browsing without fear of missing out the most interesting creative work at the moment.

  1. Designspiration

The site offers the best design inspirations that are safe for work – no nudity, so you can browse it anywhere. You can also save and organize your favourite works and search by tags and colours.

  1. DeviantArt

The site is one of the longest-running social network for artists, with over 160,000 original art works – ranging from painting and sculpture to digital and pixel art – being uploaded every day.

Design: What Does ‘Design’ Really Mean?

by Mitchell Adams and Elizabeth Webster

In the race to stem the flow of complex product imports from low wage but increasingly skilled newly industrialised countries, Australia and other developed countries are nervously talking about the importance of research, development and design. This, they think, is where the high wage jobs will come from – and we in the ‘west’ have a unique handle on this. Thailand and China can assemble complex manufactured items, but ‘we’ have the monopoly on the inventive and creative parts.

Everyone is now hopping on the design bandwagon – design systems; design thinking; business model design; registered designs and design ideation. Even the economists are talking about design (in the context of a market).

But what is design really? In many respects, this is like asking fish where the water is. Every tangible product and intangible organisation has a design and always has had. But presumably, all those schools of design and designing businesses must believe they are adding value over and above what has been.

Design as applied art

Design is traditionally associated with applied art, or more precisely, aesthetically pleasing products. Applied art in this context includes recognisable areas such as fashion design, graphic design or product design.

 

Design as functionality

Traditionally the engineers also have used the term design. But this is to do with the functionality of the product, not its appearance. Hence, we have industrial design, engineering design and process design.

Increasingly, the term design now embraces appearance that is valued both for its own sake and because it enables desirable new forms of functionality. Apple is a champion of this. They require beauty in appearance but also demand that this appearance accommodates complex functionality. And they understand the power of a brand that can optimise these combined attributes. Consumers may not necessarily think about where the iPhone or MacBook is assembled, but they are being asked to turn their minds to where the product was designed. Hence Apple’s movement away from labelling their products as “Made in China” to “Designed in California”.

 

Design as process

Design has morphed again and now the term is used to describe a process that brings together seemingly unrelated groups of people to solve complex problems. The value here is employing design thinking to solve problems that ultimately enrich a user’s experience with a product or service. It is about creating an environment where stakeholders, not just the designers, can work collaboratively in the same space to solve the problem. Compared with the traditional ‘production line’ methods, these new design processes iterate between the upstream and downstream creators and end-users to produce an integrated and well thought through good and service.

The Centre for Design Innovation at Swinburne is a creature of this process. It takes a problem and creates outcomes that are end-user centric. Each problem requires a tailored working team with the right set of multidisciplinary skills. The aim is to enrich the end users’ life.

An example of a problem currently being tackled by the Centre is the reduction of head impacts during sports-related contact. The aim of the Centre’s Smart Cap and Gear project is to design an advanced wearable product that monitors in real time forces to the head and torso during sporting activities.

Likewise, at Swinburne’s Design Factory the group attest to the philosophy that design acts as a broker, bringing people together to solve complex problems. Along with their industry partner Visy, the Design Factory’s students and design coaches have recently redesigned the milk create. Helping to reduce the costs associated with storage, cleaning and theft, the solutions generated by the Design Factory are now with Visy’s supply chain stakeholders.

For many people design as process is nothing new. They have been doing this for…ever. This ‘movement’ is not aimed at them. The value in labelling an activity comes from highlighting what is implicit and enables those who do not work this way intuitively to change their behaviour. In this sense, bandwagon slogans and business review fashions do contribute to the economy. It’s just a pity they are using a confusing word.

The Conversation

Beth Webster, Director, Centre for Transformative Innovation, Swinburne University of Technology

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Digital: Six Designers To Follow on Instagram

As I mentioned in the previous post, Instagram is not just a place to procrastinate or look at your friends’ breakfast – it is also a place to share one’s works and inspire each other.

With designers, this view seems more befitting than ever. Instagram could be portfolio to some and inspiration moodboard for others. Here are a few Instagram accounts that you should follow for some of the most creative, unique and forward-thinking works on the net.

  1. Lucia Litman

A photo posted by lucy litman (@lucialitman) on

As a photographer and food stylist, Litman’s work shows wit and charm through colourful palette and a spoonful of humour.

  1. Lauren Hom

A photo posted by Lauren Hom (@homsweethom) on


Hom is a designer, illustrator and hand letterer who is currently travelling around the world. She has worked on projects for clients like Starbucks, Youtube, Google and TIME Magazine.

  1. Daniel Aristizabal

A photo posted by Daniel Aristizabal (@darias88) on


Aristizabal is a motion graphics designer and animator. For imaginative 3D illustrations, look no further.

  1. Andrew Kovacs


Kovacs’s penchant for architecture is demonstrated in his account, through photographs of unique structures, floor plan sketches, and more.

  1. The Company You Keep


TCYK is a design-led company based in Melbourne. Specialising in brand identity and strategy, TCYK’s works will get everyone sold.

  1. Dwell Magazine

A photo posted by Dwell (@dwellmagazine) on


Dwell’s Instagram account offers compelling architecture and interior design photographs, from cottages in Baja California, Mexico to farm homes in Dolomite mountains in northeastern Italy.