CategoryExhibition

Exhibitions: Art, History and More

Sydney Architecture Festival 2017

The Sydney Architecture Festival is running for it’s 11th year this year with talks, workshops, tours and more all focused around our heritage, homes, futures and what we’re at risk of losing in this century. This year it’s going to be even more focused with the festival’s hub being set at 1SPQ for Western Sydney University (Parramatta), which stage 1 in one of Australia’s biggest urban renewal projects.

Here is a general overview of what you can expect from the festivities:

29th Sept – Party, Party, Party!

The launch party will last from 5-9pm, departing from Wharf 7, King St Wharf.
and arriving at the Peter Shergold Building.

30th Sept – Talks, Tours and Exhibitions

Finding Sydney’s “Missing Middle” Exhibition will be running from morning til afternoon at the Peter Shergold Building from 30th Sept to 1st Oct. Those wanting to learn more about mosques should check out the 9:30-1:30PM talk and tour of the Punchbowl Mosque (lunch included) and there’s also Walk, Talk and Draw Parramatta departing from the Peter Shergold Building at 12:30PM.

1st Oct – Digital Placemaking and
Platform Urbanism

This is a live podcasting event where we’ll meet the future of digital placemaking, and the impact of blockchain’s smart contracting on architecture worldwide. Can cities be platforms for distributed innovation? Register for your place to find out!

2nd Oct – World Architecture Day Oration

Kristien Ring is an architect, curator and author, her interdisciplinary studio, AA PROJECTS, deals with future oriented urban planning and architecture. During this talk she’ll present a citizen-led housing model that could make housing 20-30% more affordable than the present prices.

Event/Exhibition: 2017 Meredith Music Festival

Meredith Music Festival is back in its 27th year, and it promises a three-night event to remember.

The Supernatural Amphiteatre will host a vast range of musicians, including Todd Terje and The Olsens, Total Control, Silence Wedge, Warpaint, !!!, Japanese Breakfast, Noname, Kikagaku Moyo, The Senegambian Jazz Band, Rings Around Saturn and more to be announced soon.

While subscriber ticket ballot has closed, store and online tickets will be available starting next week for $375.20. For more information, visit Meredith Music Festival’s website.

December 8-10 | Meredith Supernatural Amphitheatre, Meredith

Music: Ben Folds is Coming Back to Australia with ‘Paper Aeroplane Request Tour’

Ben Folds is coming back to Australia next year for his solo shows.

The Paper Aeroplane Request Tour will visit Brisbane, Sydney, Canberra, Adelaide, Perth and Hobart as well as Auckland in February 2018, with a Melbourne date to be announced soon.

Each concert will take form of a two-part piano show. In the first half Folds will play his best hits from Rockin The Suburbs to Way to Normal and beyond, while in the second half the audiences will write their requested songs on a paper plane and fly them to the stage for the troubadour to select randomly and play. That’s right – you get to decide what Folds will play at the night.

Tickets will go on sale this Friday. For more information, visit Ben Folds’s website.

Brisbane: February 4 | The Tivoli

Sydney: February 6 | Sydney Opera House Concert Hall

Canberra: February 8 | Canberra Theatre Centre

Adelaide: February 9 | Festival Theatre

Perth: February 11 | Chevron Festival Gardens

Hobart: February 13 | Theatre Royal

Event/Exhibition: Celebrate Studio Ghibli Showcase, Australia

Love yourself some Studio Ghibli flicks? Well, good news – the animation house’s complete catalogue is coming to Australian cinemas.

The showcase features all 22 films from Ghibli, including the popular My Neighbor Totoro, Spirited Away and Princess Mononoke, the seldom seen Ghiblies Episode 2, and the first ever to be screened in Australia, Ocean Waves.

The opening night of Celebrate Studio Ghibli Showcase also promises an event to remember, as ticket holders can get an opportunity to win special A1 print by award-winning artist Shaun Tan.

The showcase will run from August 24 to September 20 at select cinemas across the country. For tickets and more information, visit Studio Ghibli’s website.

Event/Exhibition: Brian Reed: We Need to Talk About S-Town

Can’t get enough of podcast? This event is for you.

Sydney Opera House presents Brian Reed: We Need to Talk About S-Town, a talk with the senior producer of This American Life and the host and co-creator of investigative journalism series S-Town. Reed will participate in an in-depth conversation about the groundbreaking podcast and its consequences. Attendees will also have a chance to ask questions in the Q&A session.

Tickets start from $50.90. For more information, visit Sydney Opera House’s website.

Saturday, July 29, 7.30pm | Sydney Opera House, Bennelong Point, Sydney

Music: Paul McCartney Announces Two Extra Shows in Australia

Sir Paul McCartney has added two new shows to his Australia tour in December.

One on One tour is McCartney’s first visit to the country in almost 25 years, after having his last concert in 1993. The tour was launched in 2016, with McCartney playing 41 shows across 12 countries so far.

“We’ve been waiting to get back to Australia and New Zealand for years and now it’s finally happening,” the Beatles member said in a statement. “I’m really looking forward to the concerts as we’ve always had such a brilliant time whenever we’ve been before so we know we are in for a treat.”

Promoter Frontier Touring said it is confident that the added shows in Melbourne and Sydney (on December 6 and 12 respectively) will sell out.

Below is the tour schedule:

Perth: nib Stadium, December 2

Melbourne: AAMI Park, December 5 and 6

Brisbane: Suncorp Stadium, December 9

Sydney: Qudos Bank Arena, December 11 and 12

Auckland: Mt Smart Stadium, December 16

Tickets are now available at Frontier Touring’s website.

Graffiti: Vandalism or An Art Form?

What is “art” really? And how can we define the term? To put it simply, “art” is a form of expression. Anyone with a background in art can tell you that, regardless of the medium or the canvas. But where do we draw the line with street art? Graffiti has been a controversial topic of discussion in the art world, with many conservative audiences arguing that it is a form of vandalism. Let’s deconstruct the legal implications of graffiti.

Let’s say someone has painted over your car or your house without your permission. You wouldn’t be very happy about that. But would you feel the same if the painting was a beautiful work of art rather than a street tag? Do we discriminate the artwork based on its style or skill level? Or do we disregard the painting altogether because it’s someone’s property?

According to Angie Kordic from Wide Walls, “the excitement of being a renegade and the fear of getting caught is what many artists consider the very core of graffiti culture, especially during the days of rough, growing competition and the willing to become as good at drawing as you possibly could. When caught in act, however, the writers get charged with vandalism, fined, and given community service hours during which they help clean up graffiti. By definition, it is “an action involving deliberate destruction of or damage to public or private property”, and while we can’t argue that graffiti (mostly tags, considered a reductive form of art within graffiti community itself) often end up on someone’s walls, we do have to wonder if it really is “destruction” and if, perhaps, we’ve been asking the wrong question the whole time.”

What do you think? Is graffiti a form of vandalism?

Sources from: http://www.widewalls.ch/is-graffiti-art-or-vandalism/

Event/Exhibition: Video Junkee 2017, Sydney

Aspiring content creators and video fans won’t want to miss this event.

Video Junkee 2017 is a two-day festival celebrating the Golden Age of video, featuring a series of talks, panels, screenings, masterclasses and awards that brings together international and Australian content creators.

The line-up of speakers includes Yael Stone (Orange is the New Black), Raphael Bob-Waksberg (BoJack Horseman), Ashly Perez (Buzzfeed), Marc Fennell (The Feed), and the crews of Cleverman, Skitbox and many more.

Tickets start from $19 for individual sessions and $89 for multi-pass packages. For more information, visit Video Junkee website.

July 28-29 | Carriageworks, 245 Wilson Street, Sydney

The Compulsion to Create: ‘Outsider Art’ at MONA’s The Museum of Everything

Ted Snell, University of Western Australia

Who is an artist and when does a fabricated object become art? The 200 individuals represented in The Museum of Everything exhibition at MONA in Hobart focus our attention on these questions. On the website they are described as “untrained, unintentional, undiscovered and unclassifiable artists of modern times”. They are hermits, governesses, housewives, former miners, taxidermists and ex-soldiers, working in painting, sculpture, and an extraordinary range of other media.

While these people may “unintentionally” be making something we might want to describe as art, they are the most focused, driven and compulsive group of makers we are ever likely to encounter, and there is nothing that is unintended in the things they fabricate. Indeed they make these images and objects because they must depict in some form what is most important to them in their lives.

After an exhilarating journey through 30 rooms and many corridors of remarkable images and objects, these questions about the nature of art and the credentials of artists reach a critical mass. Finally, you arrive in a backyard courtyard, entered through a fly-wire screen door. Painted on the wall is a call-out for more people who might be included in some future exhibition. It asks, are you a self-taught or secret artist? Is your home your own personal gallery? Have you invented a private language? If so contact The Museum of Everything.

This last advertisement alerts us to the real conundrum of encountering so many unique individuals and creative practices, who likely never expected us to engage with the things they have made. If they are secret artists, who have developed a private language and wish to keep their activities to themselves, what are we doing prying into their work and their lives?

Can we even call what they make “art”, in the way we conventionally define it, if there is no intention to communicate with an audience?

Untitled (all), Bogdan Zietek, 1970–2010, Courtesy of The Museum of Everything.
Moorilla Gallery, CC BY

Outsiders, or just artists?

Other writers have struggled to explain the remarkable work produced by men and women for whom the act of creation is fundamental to their existence. After the second world war, the French artist Jean Dubuffet coined the label art brut, or raw art, to describe the amazing work he collected from individuals incarcerated in institutions or those that made art privately to fulfil a deep need.

In the 1970s, Roger Cardinal, a British academic, opted for outsider art as a more useful catch-all for artists working on the margins of the art world. Others have grouped the work of this army of practitioners under classifications such as naïve art, visionary art and folk art.

Whatever box we put them in, and none is entirely satisfactory, the artists whose works adorn the walls of MONA are clearly extraordinary.

Courtesy of The Museum of Everything.
Moorilla Gallery, CC BY

These objects have been removed from the homes, hospitals, and workshops where they were made. We are forced to make decisions about how to approach and read them and how to react after engaging with them. We must learn to lift the filters we normally have in place in an art gallery and really look hard at works that break rules, disrupt expectations and offer us insights into the lives of remarkable human beings.

Creative lives

Each of these artists has remade their world through a physical engagement with the tools of art, and because of that, we have a window into some extraordinary personal narratives.

There is Henry Darger the hospital custodian from Chicago who returned home each evening to continue working on his manuscript, “The Story of the Vivian Girls, in What is Known as the Realms of the Unreal, of the Glandeco-Angelinian War Storm, Caused by the Child Slave Rebellion”. He is represented in the exhibition by a series of consecutive panels of drawings illustrating his magnum opus, a sprawling and tender series of traced images woven together with pencil and watercolour.

Untitled (all), Alikhan Abdollahi, c. 2010, Paper mache.
Moorilla Gallery, CC BY

Adolf Wölfli was disturbed and violent, living most of his life in the Waldau Clinic, a psychiatric hospital in Bern. He drew compulsively and like Darger set out to create a massive literary work, in his case a rambling autobiography that saw his gradual elevation to the Sainthood as “St Adolf II”. His dense, complicated and intense drawings in pencil fill the page, leaving no space inactive.

In 2007, I had the opportunity to meet Stan Hopewell, who is represented in this exhibition by his masterwork “The Last Supper”. The task appeared so great, so necessary and so profound that to embark on it Stan required divine guidance. When his wife Joyce became ill, Stan made a pact with his God that he would continue to write and paint to celebrate God’s Love while Joyce remained alive.

Over the next five years, he filled his house with paintings, which he believed were made with the assistance of an “an unseen Angel” and wrote pages upon pages of a stream-of-consciousness manifesto about his life and his beliefs. The day Joyce died, Stan stopped writing and painting. His fantastical works incorporate the events of his life, his family, his abiding faith and current events. They were agglomerations that evolved, each addition adding to the complexity and the scale of the work, incorporating angels with flapping wings, illuminated with lights and adorned with his wife’s knickknacks.

Ambition and obsession

Darger, Wölfli, and Hopewell are only three of the human stories from the vast array that lie behind the over 2,000 objects hung throughout the temporary gallery space of MONA. Of course, they add a dimension to our reading of the work, but it is also true that the imagery is so powerful, so disruptive, so fresh and confronting that it commands our attention.

Untitled (all), Calvin and Ruby Black, 1955–1972, Courtesy of The Museum of Everything.
CC BY

What makes this work so arresting is the urgency of its making. These are images and objects that had to be made, that could no longer be repressed. Whether intended for others or created for solitary contemplation, they have an intensity that draws us deep into their fabricated worlds.

Obsessive detail is a common stylistic trait. Scale and ambition are others. Hans-Jörg Georgi’s amazing flight of aircraft, designed for escape from an uninhabitable planet, spiral through the gallery space in a torrent of energy. Their fuselages, carefully constructed from cardboard and tape, are maniacally compulsive, showing each detail of the engines and propellers, the wing mechanisms, passenger decks and windows. Both prophetic and wildly funny, this work, like so many others in the exhibition, requires a shift in consciousness to fully absorb its significance.

Untitled (all), Hans-Jörg Georgi, 2010–15, Courtesy of The Museum of Everything.
Moorilla Gallery, CC BY

What better place to confront these works than in MONA, a space that has rethought the modern museum and helped us to re-imagine the experience of engaging with artworks? The works are set within rooms designed to create the sense of a slightly dilapidated home-museum: wallpapered, sporadically architraved, cluttered with objects and glass display cases.

It is James Brett, the founder of The Museum of Everything and curator of this show, whose guiding intelligence is everywhere present. Each room is themed. Carefully positioned works draw you through into the next room of wonders where new relationships and variations on old themes play out.

Like every passionate collection, the compulsion to overwhelm is never resisted, but strangely this leads to an insatiable appetite for more. This is most definitely an exhibition that both requires and demands multiple visits.

Which brings us back to those big questions: is it art, and should we be viewing it? Perhaps the best way to describe the individuals whose works fill the Museum of Everything is that they separately and as a group pose questions about the nature of art and challenge us to ponder what it means to be an artist. Significantly, through this process, they highlight the sense of our own humanity and showcase the qualities we ascribe to humanness. What could be more rewarding, inspiring and affirming?


The ConversationThe Museum of Everything will showing at MONA until April 2 2018.

Ted Snell, Professor, Chief Cultural Officer, Cultural Precinct, University of Western Australia

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Event/Exhibition: Adobe ‘MAKE IT’ Conference 2017, Sydney

One of the biggest creativity events in Australia is coming to Sydney this August.

Adobe ‘MAKE IT’ Conference 2017 is a two-day event filled with inspiring talks from local and international speakers, labs, workshops, and seminars as well as sneak-peek from Adobe evangelists about updates in creative toolsets such as Creative Cloud.

Speakers include war photographer Nicole Tung, crafter Kitiya Palaskas, and designers Timothy Goodman, Mike Alderson and James Noble.

Tickets start from $99. For more information, visit Adobe website.

August 2-3 | International Convention Centre Sydney, 14 Darling Drive, Sydney