What’s the deal with Construction Art? Is it really art? Is it important or had relevance towards the art movements we know today? Being a major influence in the Bauhaus and De Stijl movement,  Constructivism emerged as an artistic and architectural concept. In 1913, Constructivism was created by Vladimir Tatlin in Russia.

As a rejection of independent and sovereign art, Tatlin aimed  ‘to construct’ art for social purposes. During the 20th century, it influenced architecture design, graphic design, industrial design, theatre, film, dance, fashion as well as music. The definition of Constructivism was a combination of faktura meaning the particular material properties of an object, and tektonika, meaning its spatial presence.

It was known that the first  Constructivists were artists like Liubov Popova, Alexander Vesnin, Rodchenko, Varvara Stepanova, and theorists Aleksei Gan, Boris Arvatov and Osip Brik. They were early developers of a technique that we know now as the photomontage. Sharing similarities with Dadaism, the collage method was less destructive during the Constructivism movement.

In this day and age, many contemporary artists have taken upon literally deconstructions of the idea of construction art. With independent artists and online retailers selling very similar constructivism artworks such as photographs of excavators and machinery. You can find these works at Fine Art America.

Images sourced from Fine Art America.